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Cozy: The Art of Arranging Yourself in the World

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The New York Times bestselling author of Happens Every Day, Isabel Gillies, presents a fresh and inspiring look at the subtle art of cozy—part manifesto, part lifestyle guide, part memoir—that shows fans of The Little Book of Hygge that true comfort comes from within. When we talk about being cozy, most of us think of a favorite sweater or a steaming cup of tea on a rainy d The New York Times bestselling author of Happens Every Day, Isabel Gillies, presents a fresh and inspiring look at the subtle art of cozy—part manifesto, part lifestyle guide, part memoir—that shows fans of The Little Book of Hygge that true comfort comes from within. When we talk about being cozy, most of us think of a favorite sweater or a steaming cup of tea on a rainy day. But to Isabel Gillies, coziness goes beyond mere objects. To be truly cozy, she argues, means learning to identify the innermost truth of yourself and carrying it into the world, no matter your environment. Starting when she was young, Gillies has gradually learned the art and subtle beauty of creating a life where you feel safe, steadied, and at home in the world. From old family recipes and subway rides to jury duty and hospital stays, in Cozy Gillies shows readers that true ease stems not with throw pillows and a candle, but from opportunities to feel that we are part of something bigger than ourselves, and learn to make ourselves at home no matter where we are. Simple choices can make a hectic life or an uncomfortable situation just a little more comfortable—you just have to know what to do. Just as Marie Kondo offered a philosophy for how to tidy, Gillies offers a new way of occupying the spaces we live in. Starting with yourself, then broadening to your home, your community, and the world at large, Cozy will show you how to bring the truth of who you are into any situation, easy or challenging. As Gillies says, “Cozy isn’t something that just exists. You have to make cozy happen.” Written with profound warmth and featuring hand-drawn illustrations, this wise, necessary book is call to action for each of us to seek out those often-missed opportunities to care for ourselves, and to begin living a more intimate and authentic life.

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The New York Times bestselling author of Happens Every Day, Isabel Gillies, presents a fresh and inspiring look at the subtle art of cozy—part manifesto, part lifestyle guide, part memoir—that shows fans of The Little Book of Hygge that true comfort comes from within. When we talk about being cozy, most of us think of a favorite sweater or a steaming cup of tea on a rainy d The New York Times bestselling author of Happens Every Day, Isabel Gillies, presents a fresh and inspiring look at the subtle art of cozy—part manifesto, part lifestyle guide, part memoir—that shows fans of The Little Book of Hygge that true comfort comes from within. When we talk about being cozy, most of us think of a favorite sweater or a steaming cup of tea on a rainy day. But to Isabel Gillies, coziness goes beyond mere objects. To be truly cozy, she argues, means learning to identify the innermost truth of yourself and carrying it into the world, no matter your environment. Starting when she was young, Gillies has gradually learned the art and subtle beauty of creating a life where you feel safe, steadied, and at home in the world. From old family recipes and subway rides to jury duty and hospital stays, in Cozy Gillies shows readers that true ease stems not with throw pillows and a candle, but from opportunities to feel that we are part of something bigger than ourselves, and learn to make ourselves at home no matter where we are. Simple choices can make a hectic life or an uncomfortable situation just a little more comfortable—you just have to know what to do. Just as Marie Kondo offered a philosophy for how to tidy, Gillies offers a new way of occupying the spaces we live in. Starting with yourself, then broadening to your home, your community, and the world at large, Cozy will show you how to bring the truth of who you are into any situation, easy or challenging. As Gillies says, “Cozy isn’t something that just exists. You have to make cozy happen.” Written with profound warmth and featuring hand-drawn illustrations, this wise, necessary book is call to action for each of us to seek out those often-missed opportunities to care for ourselves, and to begin living a more intimate and authentic life.

30 review for Cozy: The Art of Arranging Yourself in the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kazen

    This book could also be subtitled, 'How to be Cozy Anywhere'. According to Gillies cozy is more than hot tea and fuzzy slippers, it's knowing what calms and centers you. She finds it both in places you would expect (baths) and places you don't (jury duty). If I had to boil it down I'd say that cozy = self-awareness + mindfulness + self-care The book starts on a personal scale then broadens out to feeling cozy in your home and in your community. She emphasizes that we'll all find different things c This book could also be subtitled, 'How to be Cozy Anywhere'. According to Gillies cozy is more than hot tea and fuzzy slippers, it's knowing what calms and centers you. She finds it both in places you would expect (baths) and places you don't (jury duty). If I had to boil it down I'd say that cozy = self-awareness + mindfulness + self-care The book starts on a personal scale then broadens out to feeling cozy in your home and in your community. She emphasizes that we'll all find different things comforting, and that part of the journey is figuring out what's cozy to us. Instead of 'this is cozy, do this,' it's 'these things work for me, your mileage may vary.' I'm thankful for that, and it did get me thinking about what I find cozy. There's curling up with a blanket and a good book and preferably a cat, of course. Fresh flowers on my desk. Libraries. I think Gillies and I would agree on these points. But she finds walks with friends cozy, while I would much rather go on treks across town by myself. And that's fine. While some of the things she mentions can be enjoyed for free many require disposable income, free time, or comfortable circumstances, and Gillies acknowledges that not everyone has those things. She's also quite determined to find cozy in the most trying circumstances, and I personally draw the line at when you're sick and in pain in a hospital waiting room. She concludes that the nurses' scrubs looked soft and therefore cozy, but... yeah. The most valuable thing I got from this book is that it shifted my perception of cozy towards situations as well as things. Tea and my reading chair are cozy, for sure, but so is visiting the library and going to the florist to pick out a flower for my desk. So while not life-changing, this book did make me more open to seeing the cozy around me and more comfortable making my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Cozy romanticises the little things in life we find small pleasures and comfort in but may fail to take note. Having recently graduated from high school and fallen into a reading slump following my final exams, this book reminded me of habits and traditions I have as a child in relation to reading books. Gillies’ carefully points out little things, making the reader wonder, “what cozy things make me tick?”. I found myself reading this book during my commute increasingly, finding something cozy i Cozy romanticises the little things in life we find small pleasures and comfort in but may fail to take note. Having recently graduated from high school and fallen into a reading slump following my final exams, this book reminded me of habits and traditions I have as a child in relation to reading books. Gillies’ carefully points out little things, making the reader wonder, “what cozy things make me tick?”. I found myself reading this book during my commute increasingly, finding something cozy in being amongst strangers, present but lost in a book. However, my one criticism of the book is that at times it is highly reflective of a upper-middle class income and although it offers some snippets of coziness which does not require a financial investments, I would have liked to see more if it within the book as well. Overall, Cozy is an easy to book to enjoy and encourages its audience to find joy in the small things and reflects that cozy is not so much about your physical environment but the way you engage with it. *Thank you to Edelweiss for providing a free Advanced Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.*

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I have no idea why this book was written and I have no idea how I got to 71%. I just read a section on why London is so cozy. What? Is the point of this book? Freal though. So far I have gathered that literally anything can be cozy and there is no rules or limitations apparently. And did I really need someone to point out that blankets and sunshine are things people enjoy? I thought about giving up a few times but was kinda bored and in a daze and kept reading and now that I am at 71% I can't gi I have no idea why this book was written and I have no idea how I got to 71%. I just read a section on why London is so cozy. What? Is the point of this book? Freal though. So far I have gathered that literally anything can be cozy and there is no rules or limitations apparently. And did I really need someone to point out that blankets and sunshine are things people enjoy? I thought about giving up a few times but was kinda bored and in a daze and kept reading and now that I am at 71% I can't give up

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    3 and half stars. Seeing a few other reviews here, that to me, seem drastically negative, where people remark that this book was too fluffy, or too silly, or too cloying, etc. Or that they just have no idea why the author wrote it. I am wondering what exactly these people thought a book titled Cozy was going to be about? I expected it would contain friendly unassuming suggestions about how one might make oneself feel a bit more at ease. a light respite from so much ugliness we are all currently 3 and half stars. Seeing a few other reviews here, that to me, seem drastically negative, where people remark that this book was too fluffy, or too silly, or too cloying, etc. Or that they just have no idea why the author wrote it. I am wondering what exactly these people thought a book titled Cozy was going to be about? I expected it would contain friendly unassuming suggestions about how one might make oneself feel a bit more at ease. a light respite from so much ugliness we are all currently facing on multiple fronts. And that is essentially what it turned out to be.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tasya Dita

    I received an e-arc of this book from publishers through Edelweiss plus in exchange for an honest opinion DNF at 21% I'm sorry, I really tried to make it to the 50% mark at least, but I just couldn't. This book really did not speak to me, it felt pointless and long winded at times. I love the concept of cozy being things that we find inside ourselves instead of something we create, but the way it is explained just completely lost me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Asia

    I didn't read a ton of this book but I got the gist and I like it-- cozy is a frame of mind, and it includes a lot more than blankets and mugs of hot cocoa! I've had fun finding coziness in everyday life--even at work!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melchshake

    This book is a total rip of the Danish book Hygge.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ann T

    DNF at 18%. I really wanted to like this book but I could connect with the way it was written.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carianne Carleo-Evangelist

    This book took me a while to get into. I went to the signing & launch for it, and I was curious but found that it wasn't the right book for that time so I put it aside for a while and passed on the copy to a friend. I'd actually forgotten that I joined the library queue for the Kindle edition and when it landed on my Kindle earlier this week I gave it another go. Surprisingly, I got right into it and finished it quickly. While I still don't find things like the 1 train cozy, I understood Gil This book took me a while to get into. I went to the signing & launch for it, and I was curious but found that it wasn't the right book for that time so I put it aside for a while and passed on the copy to a friend. I'd actually forgotten that I joined the library queue for the Kindle edition and when it landed on my Kindle earlier this week I gave it another go. Surprisingly, I got right into it and finished it quickly. While I still don't find things like the 1 train cozy, I understood Gillies' point that it's how you look at things -- and that cozy is a concept rather than a definite. I also loved her "seven minute Louvre" as sometimes I want to see every nook and cranny of a museum and others (looking at you, Rijksmuseum & Night Watch), I just have a quick hit list. I also enjoyed her seeking out hygge in Denmark and other elements of travel coziness. An interesting book, and I'm glad I read it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    You really don't need a synopsis here, the title tells you exactly what you need to know. Essentially, Isabel Gillies explains how to find coziness in every moment, even the bad, to ground yourself. This book was cute, and sort of full of common-sense. It was a nice read, but I'm not sure that I got anything out of it. Why did I rate it 3 stars then, you ask? Because I do think that there's someone out there who isn't as self-aware as me that could get a lot out of this book. I hope that roundin You really don't need a synopsis here, the title tells you exactly what you need to know. Essentially, Isabel Gillies explains how to find coziness in every moment, even the bad, to ground yourself. This book was cute, and sort of full of common-sense. It was a nice read, but I'm not sure that I got anything out of it. Why did I rate it 3 stars then, you ask? Because I do think that there's someone out there who isn't as self-aware as me that could get a lot out of this book. I hope that rounding up my rating will help that person pick this book up.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Kelman

    Sweet book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Muller

    My cozy is reading a book picked out by @Emily at the BPL on a rainy day with a weekend full of friend time ahead of me

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    How did this book even get published? It's such a mess. For starters, the whole premise is pretty pointless. The moral of the story is that "cozy" is whatever you want to make it be, so why do we then need an entire book - set up dictionary-style - of the author's favorite things? I finished this book - who knows why - but to be honest she complete lost me on about page four when she said that jury duty was cozy! Then there's the matter of the way this book is written. There are a whole bunch of How did this book even get published? It's such a mess. For starters, the whole premise is pretty pointless. The moral of the story is that "cozy" is whatever you want to make it be, so why do we then need an entire book - set up dictionary-style - of the author's favorite things? I finished this book - who knows why - but to be honest she complete lost me on about page four when she said that jury duty was cozy! Then there's the matter of the way this book is written. There are a whole bunch of random lists of stuff that seem thrown together and completely unnecessary. It's as if these were her notes while writing the book and rather than actually flush them out into readable sentences, she gave up and just put her notes in the book. The author is also remarkably privileged which comes across as both something she's completely unaware of (talking about taking a bath at least twice every day - ain't nobody got time for that!) and something she's overly apologetic for. On more than one occasion she suggests that elements of cultural appropriation are "cozy" and then calls herself out for it and apologizes - as if that makes everything ok. She also explains things in unnecessary detail: an aside to explain what an Amazon Echo is and how she uses it, a description of what people are eating while she's talking to them, why she's using the word "bummer" even though apparently she has negative associations with the word, etc. By the end I was only finishing this book out of morbid curiosity. It's a fast read, because of the dictionary style, and the last twenty pages or so are recipes I have no desire to make.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dixie

    I like the overall theme and the many excellent examples of finding coziness no matter the situation.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Edling

    @isabelgillies checked out your new book, COZY, and was struck by how accessible your concepts are. Reminds me of my man Marcel Proust's "Madeleine Moment" 🍪 thanks for sharing your talents with us ✌ @isabelgillies checked out your new book, COZY, and was struck by how accessible your concepts are. Reminds me of my man Marcel Proust's "Madeleine Moment" 🍪 thanks for sharing your talents with us ✌️

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

    I wanted to love this book so much, and I did most enjoy parts IV & V (Journey and When It Feels Hard), but for the first 50% of the book I kind of just wanted to get on with it. Here are my favorite excerpts: "...coziness can’t be defined by one standard; it only aligns with what is inside of us. What we know, what we love, what we feel connected to and familiar with." "So much of cozy you can touch with your hands—a book, bathwater, a mug—but a lot of cozy responds to the ether, the mystic, I wanted to love this book so much, and I did most enjoy parts IV & V (Journey and When It Feels Hard), but for the first 50% of the book I kind of just wanted to get on with it. Here are my favorite excerpts: "...coziness can’t be defined by one standard; it only aligns with what is inside of us. What we know, what we love, what we feel connected to and familiar with." "So much of cozy you can touch with your hands—a book, bathwater, a mug—but a lot of cozy responds to the ether, the mystic, the ritual and spiritual." "Pepsi ice cubes and peach cobbler do not change the reason you are in the hospital, but they or something like them, like the blanket-warming ovens, might make the experience more breathable—even, in moments, enjoyable." "Coziness is not about lying around. It’s the opposite. It’s the fuel you need to engage." "that is sort of the point of the book: finding connection with anything—even if you don’t like it." "Coziness, whatever that is to you, is life. It’s life at its greatest."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    "We're all different, but I'm pretty sure we all want to hold on to something." So much truth in this statement. I adored this book. I found it incredibly life changing and soul provoking. This book took us into the world of Cozy and what it means to find coziness within yourself and in all of the little things that make up who we are. We can't control our circumstances, but we can control how respond to the things that happen to us. We can control what we focus on and how we allow it to impac "We're all different, but I'm pretty sure we all want to hold on to something." So much truth in this statement. I adored this book. I found it incredibly life changing and soul provoking. This book took us into the world of Cozy and what it means to find coziness within yourself and in all of the little things that make up who we are. We can't control our circumstances, but we can control how respond to the things that happen to us. We can control what we focus on and how we allow it to impact our lives. Living with a chronic illness, life has been anything but cozy lately. Hospitals, doctors appointments, scans, scans and more scans. Things have been rough and life has felt so dark, but this book was the spark that I needed to shift my perspective. I gave it 5 stars because I feel like this book has an important message for everyone. Read it, you won't regret it, I promise.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    “...in every time of personal upheaval and reckoning, the smallest parts of life have been the only things powerful enough to pull me through.” Full disclosure: I know Isabel and think she is fabulous. But I swear I wouldn't give it a 5 star rating unless I really felt it deserved it. It was a great read - lots of amazing moments. Best of all, it made me think a lot about all the coziness in my life and where I can bring even more cozy into it. It's a beautiful book. Well done, Isabel.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    I liked the premise, and have looked for things that make me cozy (identified them, and sometimes seeked them out in a new place) since reading this book. However, I felt the book’s structure could’ve been stronger. For example, Gillies references certain things that make something cozy, like control, but these things are only mentioned every once and awhile and never clearly defined and outlined thoroughly in the beginning. It seems like they should be if they are the key points backing up what I liked the premise, and have looked for things that make me cozy (identified them, and sometimes seeked them out in a new place) since reading this book. However, I felt the book’s structure could’ve been stronger. For example, Gillies references certain things that make something cozy, like control, but these things are only mentioned every once and awhile and never clearly defined and outlined thoroughly in the beginning. It seems like they should be if they are the key points backing up what the book is about. There is also a lot of apologizing at the start of chapters. While I admire Gillies’ efforts to acknowledge how varied the world is, sometimes it’s best to just say what you want to say. I found a lot of it weaving in all different directions, but my favorite parts were the lists of things that make someone cozy, especially the list at the end of the Acknowledgements. All in all, I think it’s worth reading enough of the book to get the premise of it, and to make you reflect on what makes you cozy personally. That is definitely a nice result of reading the book :)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Noel

    The idea of this book was good and there were some parts I really liked that made me appreciate aspects of my life more. However... The author rambles throughout the entire book, going on many tangents that don't seem to connects, she uses the word cozy a million times and never once uses a synonym. She also has many cases of terrible word choice that made me cringe. She included random pictures and lists that aren't even referenced in the text the majority of the time. She also acts like an auth The idea of this book was good and there were some parts I really liked that made me appreciate aspects of my life more. However... The author rambles throughout the entire book, going on many tangents that don't seem to connects, she uses the word cozy a million times and never once uses a synonym. She also has many cases of terrible word choice that made me cringe. She included random pictures and lists that aren't even referenced in the text the majority of the time. She also acts like an authority on so many subjects just because she visited a bunch of places. If the text was formated in a story-like manner it would have been better, but instead its really repetitive to the point it's preachy. She even talked about her thought processes on writing the book that were extremely boring. Omit that stuff out! She has no talent for writing, although there were a few good lines. Any average person could come up with something like them though. I had high hopes for this book because of the title, but it was a disappointment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    I shouldn't have finished this book. It's as simple as that. The longer version is that I enjoyed books like "The Year of Living Danishly" so much that I thought there had to be something redeemable further along in the text. Not even kind of. Unfortunately this was something that would have been a charming blog post that instead became a full-length book. It was not well researched or founded on anything substantive other than the author's own personal whims. I hesitate to say "do not read" bec I shouldn't have finished this book. It's as simple as that. The longer version is that I enjoyed books like "The Year of Living Danishly" so much that I thought there had to be something redeemable further along in the text. Not even kind of. Unfortunately this was something that would have been a charming blog post that instead became a full-length book. It was not well researched or founded on anything substantive other than the author's own personal whims. I hesitate to say "do not read" because I know it takes a great deal of effort to create a book, but that would be my general commentary. Still, happy reading and happy cozy living-- (Book 43 - 2019)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    I was pretty uncertain about this book when I started. The author seemed a touch eccentric, and I wasn’t sure her outlook resinated with me. However, towards the end I decided that I actually really enjoyed this read. She makes several excellent points, and the book as a whole serves as a reminder that no matter the situation if you take the time you can find a sense of belonging, feel grounded, and ‘cozy.’ That isn’t a bad concept. I can see where this might not appeal to everyone; if you don’t I was pretty uncertain about this book when I started. The author seemed a touch eccentric, and I wasn’t sure her outlook resinated with me. However, towards the end I decided that I actually really enjoyed this read. She makes several excellent points, and the book as a whole serves as a reminder that no matter the situation if you take the time you can find a sense of belonging, feel grounded, and ‘cozy.’ That isn’t a bad concept. I can see where this might not appeal to everyone; if you don’t have time for the little things, or you’re looking for a true guide on how to live then this isn’t for you. This book truly is cozy in its own right. Reading it is a steady reminder of all of the comforting things you’ve experienced from childhood on. The nostalgia of mailboxes and postcards, Xerox and other seemingly outdated technology; that’s what makes up the pages of this book. It’s cozy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I enjoyed this book; it reminded me a little of The Inviting Life: An Inspirational Guide to Homemaking, Hosting and Opening the Door to Happiness. Both emphasize the happiness to be found in everyday life. And it has recipes! Easy ones. I loved the photograph of the author's grandmother, the only photograph in the whole book. Might have to buy myself a copy of this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I really liked the introductory essay to this book, and I was prompted to think back to why I came to think of certain things as cozy, which was nice. I also liked that she seemed to appreciate that the concept of cozy can be a bit privileged (every time I wanted to stop and say "wait a minute, not everyone can . . . " she would address that very thing in the next sentence.) As the book went on, there seemed to be less and less to it, but I will say it was a cozy experience to read, right down t I really liked the introductory essay to this book, and I was prompted to think back to why I came to think of certain things as cozy, which was nice. I also liked that she seemed to appreciate that the concept of cozy can be a bit privileged (every time I wanted to stop and say "wait a minute, not everyone can . . . " she would address that very thing in the next sentence.) As the book went on, there seemed to be less and less to it, but I will say it was a cozy experience to read, right down to the way the book felt in my hands and the type of paper it was printed on.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Young

    After seeing the Gillies interview on the Majority Report with Sam Seder, something about it made me want to read this book. Maybe it was the idea of finding inner piece in a turbulent time, or just the seeming bubbliness that made this woman obsessed with the idea of 'cozy' even in the worst of places that intrigued me. Admittedly, when I got to the page (9) that said this book germinated during a divorce, I laughed out loud and said, "I knew it!" Only that type of trauma could have one pushing After seeing the Gillies interview on the Majority Report with Sam Seder, something about it made me want to read this book. Maybe it was the idea of finding inner piece in a turbulent time, or just the seeming bubbliness that made this woman obsessed with the idea of 'cozy' even in the worst of places that intrigued me. Admittedly, when I got to the page (9) that said this book germinated during a divorce, I laughed out loud and said, "I knew it!" Only that type of trauma could have one pushing to find the best in the worst situations, whether it be fleeing from genocide, or coping with your life as you know it crumbling around you. How does one move on and find happiness? Or coziness? I am unfamiliar with the idea of hygge, so don't have that foundation to start from. For me, this seemed like finding gratitude in small things, things we take for granted. They can be personal, like things you own or the nature of your home, or shared like nature, or the local pub or coffee shop. The idea of really picking out things that you appreciate, while hard work, does seem to lead to increase of encountering things that make you feel cozy, as you naturally gravitate towards them. It's like the secret, for internal happiness, but probably more practical and attainable, depending on your goals. The book is fairly light, and maintains a cheerful lilt throughout, even in the final sections where it deals with harder life scenarios. Was an enjoyable read; definitely not for everybody. A common mistake people will make is trying to make things that are cozy for other people cozy for themselves, without recognizing that they are separate people. Cozy is self-defined, a mentality more than specific objects.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charissa

    This book is not what I thought it was going to be. It felt more like a memoir of the author's life rather than a general exploration of what coziness means to people. That said, there were some points here and there I could relate on and the book did leave me with nice reminders that, A) We can find coziness anywhere, even in difficult moments and, B) To appreciate the comforting things in our lives, both big and small.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachael Westgate

    Nice fluffy read to make me feel super cozy amidst the chaos that is summertime. Thanks for the gift dorian 🥰 Was bummed out about all of the typos (literally tons spotted) and the writing style melody didn’t really resonate with me. Recognizing that the author has dyslexia and that may have manifested in the style (loves the representation!), but thought editor should have caught the copy edit stuff.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda Lomazow

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A lovely book a book about family traditions holidays where traveling to be together crowding on the couch laughing eating being cozy,New yorkers will identify how taking the train reading your book brings happiness & yes making your bed with your husbands help lovely.A wonderful warm book highly recommend,

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    The book looks nice and has a good concept, but it is ramblings about how everything you touch can be cozy. I was hoping for something more along the lines of hygge, but instead it’s the author going on about every item she owns being cozy. I skimmed the majority of it because it wasn’t interesting or relatable at all.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Söderlund

    Cozy There are aspects of this book that are true gems — finding cozy when life is sad and hard was one of the themes that spoke to me. Them there were other parts that seemed more like a stream of consciousness and a few I just couldn’t relate too. Overall, I’m glad I read this cozy book!

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