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I Think You're Wrong (But I'm Listening): A Guide to Grace-Filled Political Conversations

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“Sarah and Beth are an absolute gift to our culture right now. Not only do they offer balanced perspectives from each political ideology, but they teach us how to dialogue well, without sacrificing our humanity.” —Jen Hatmaker, New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and founder of Legacy Collective   “Sarah from the left and Beth from the right serve as our guides throug “Sarah and Beth are an absolute gift to our culture right now. Not only do they offer balanced perspectives from each political ideology, but they teach us how to dialogue well, without sacri­ficing our humanity.” —Jen Hatmaker, New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and founder of Legacy Collective   “Sarah from the left and Beth from the right serve as our guides through conflict and complexity, delivering us into connection. I wish every person living in the United States would read this compelling book, from the youngest voter to those holding the highest office.” —Emily P. Freeman, Wall Street Journal bestselling author of Simply Tuesday and The Next Right Thing   More than ever, politics seems driven by conflict and anger. People sitting together in pews every Sunday have started to feel like strangers, loved ones at the dinner table like enemies. Toxic political dialogue, hate-filled rants on social media, and agenda-driven news stories have become the new norm. It’s exhausting, and it’s too much.   In I Think You’re Wrong (But I’m Listening), two working moms from opposite ends of the political spectrum contend that there is a better way. They believe that we can choose to respect the dignity of every person, choose to recognize that issues are nuanced and can’t be reduced to political talking points, choose to listen in order to understand, choose gentleness and patience.   Sarah from the left and Beth from the right invite those looking for something better than the status quo to pull up a chair and listen to the principles, insights, and practical tools they have learned hosting their fast-growing podcast Pantsuit Politics. As impossible as it might seem, people from opposing political perspectives truly can have calm, grace-­filled conversations with one another—by putting relationship before policy and understanding before argument.

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“Sarah and Beth are an absolute gift to our culture right now. Not only do they offer balanced perspectives from each political ideology, but they teach us how to dialogue well, without sacrificing our humanity.” —Jen Hatmaker, New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and founder of Legacy Collective   “Sarah from the left and Beth from the right serve as our guides throug “Sarah and Beth are an absolute gift to our culture right now. Not only do they offer balanced perspectives from each political ideology, but they teach us how to dialogue well, without sacri­ficing our humanity.” —Jen Hatmaker, New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and founder of Legacy Collective   “Sarah from the left and Beth from the right serve as our guides through conflict and complexity, delivering us into connection. I wish every person living in the United States would read this compelling book, from the youngest voter to those holding the highest office.” —Emily P. Freeman, Wall Street Journal bestselling author of Simply Tuesday and The Next Right Thing   More than ever, politics seems driven by conflict and anger. People sitting together in pews every Sunday have started to feel like strangers, loved ones at the dinner table like enemies. Toxic political dialogue, hate-filled rants on social media, and agenda-driven news stories have become the new norm. It’s exhausting, and it’s too much.   In I Think You’re Wrong (But I’m Listening), two working moms from opposite ends of the political spectrum contend that there is a better way. They believe that we can choose to respect the dignity of every person, choose to recognize that issues are nuanced and can’t be reduced to political talking points, choose to listen in order to understand, choose gentleness and patience.   Sarah from the left and Beth from the right invite those looking for something better than the status quo to pull up a chair and listen to the principles, insights, and practical tools they have learned hosting their fast-growing podcast Pantsuit Politics. As impossible as it might seem, people from opposing political perspectives truly can have calm, grace-­filled conversations with one another—by putting relationship before policy and understanding before argument.

30 review for I Think You're Wrong (But I'm Listening): A Guide to Grace-Filled Political Conversations

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Gunderman

    This book should be required reading for every elected official, and every person registering to vote. But, much like their podcast, this book only really uses politics as the basis for discussion on how to human. So even if your aren’t a policy wonk or political junkie, this book has something for you to help you relate better to others on the hardest, most important things in life.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    I was lucky enough to read an advanced copy of this book and I cannot wait until it enters the world. Beth Silvers and Sarah Stewart Holland have reminded us that talking politics shouldn't be taboo because it is all about living in community with one another. Please go pre-order this book for yourself and all the people in your life that you've avoided talking politics with because in the words of Beth and Sarah, we've all "changed 'you shouldn't talk politics' to 'you should only talk to peopl I was lucky enough to read an advanced copy of this book and I cannot wait until it enters the world. Beth Silvers and Sarah Stewart Holland have reminded us that talking politics shouldn't be taboo because it is all about living in community with one another. Please go pre-order this book for yourself and all the people in your life that you've avoided talking politics with because in the words of Beth and Sarah, we've all "changed 'you shouldn't talk politics' to 'you should only talk to people who reinforce your worldview.'" This book will help change that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    In this well-written guide, Sarah and Beth broach ways we can communicate respectfully while discussing critical issues. Instead of being instantly combative, we can listen and empathize. Try to understand rather than insult. We are not enemies, we are citizens. We are capable of having respectful conversations, even if we disagree, and still be civil. The reminder that our differences are not more important than our similarities had a profound effect on me. And while the faith pieces do not app In this well-written guide, Sarah and Beth broach ways we can communicate respectfully while discussing critical issues. Instead of being instantly combative, we can listen and empathize. Try to understand rather than insult. We are not enemies, we are citizens. We are capable of having respectful conversations, even if we disagree, and still be civil. The reminder that our differences are not more important than our similarities had a profound effect on me. And while the faith pieces do not apply to me personally, the overall message here is one for all humans.

  4. 5 out of 5

    McKenzie/literarydragon

    If you have any interest in America as an entity right now you should probably read I Think You’re Wrong (But I’m Listening): A Guide to Grace-Filled Political Conversations. Don’t worry it’s short and fast. It’s part how-to manual and part open discussion of some of the issues plaguing the political divide right now. Only two people with this kind of respect for each other and themselves could have written this book. I know it is so necessary right now. I don’t believe it could have been written If you have any interest in America as an entity right now you should probably read I Think You’re Wrong (But I’m Listening): A Guide to Grace-Filled Political Conversations. Don’t worry it’s short and fast. It’s part how-to manual and part open discussion of some of the issues plaguing the political divide right now. Only two people with this kind of respect for each other and themselves could have written this book. I know it is so necessary right now. I don’t believe it could have been written or released right after Trump was elected because I think some of us needed to get some anger off our chests first. Now, most of us have calmed down enough to realize that we can’t keep going down this road and we’re sick of people just fighting on party lines. It’s exhausting and it’s not constructive in the slightest. Sarah and Beth are also writing in the hope that people will realize their need to educate themselves. Not just on what an issue means now, but on what it meant when it began and what it can mean in the future. They tackled some hot-button issues and opened them up a little bit without making them the entire basis of the book or chapter. There was a Christian slant to the writing, but not in an annoying or pushy way. Both writers acknowledge that many people reading their work will not be Christians, but because their faith means so much to them they don’t feel that they could have written the book without including it. And I think it’s an important inclusion simply due to the fact that the book is about not being argumentative and angry or to stop listening just because you disagree with some of what a person is saying. For that reason I not only kept reading the book but I chose not to skip over the Christian specific moments. No, I’m not converted, but I’m also not angry with them for including this side of themselves in what must have been a very personal book to write. Each chapter is built around a specific tip the pair would like people to try and each one ended with some homework that is meant to expand the reader’s viewpoint on any number of issues. I can openly admit here that I did not in fact try all of these homework assignments though I’m sure the ones I skipped would have been as ... for the full review please visit https://www.literarydragonreviews.web...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Melinda Wedding

    This book so far gives serious food-for-thought for engaging in those awkward conversations with people you know can be combative. I've used ideas presented by the authors successfully in a couple of discussions. We all don't have to agree on everything. There are absolutely places where I will not budge my convictions, but seeing both sides can help break our ideological logjams and find some middle ground. That's a solid place to start to getting this country back on track.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anna Smith

    I was lucky enough to receive an advance copy of this book. The authors are the hosts of the podcast Pantsuit Politics. “Sarah from the left” and “Beth from the right” give us very timely reminders in this book. Reminders like: - It IS ok to discuss politics - It IS ok to voice your opinion on polarizing issues. - It IS ok to disagree with someone politically and still respect them as a human being. Beth and Sarah also remind us that politics is not the team sport we tend to see it as. It is not id I was lucky enough to receive an advance copy of this book. The authors are the hosts of the podcast Pantsuit Politics. “Sarah from the left” and “Beth from the right” give us very timely reminders in this book. Reminders like: - It IS ok to discuss politics - It IS ok to voice your opinion on polarizing issues. - It IS ok to disagree with someone politically and still respect them as a human being. Beth and Sarah also remind us that politics is not the team sport we tend to see it as. It is not ideal to blindly follow anyone, let alone a political party. Adopting a “team” mentality only furthers the “us vs. them” attitude that will only bring harm to our nation, our neighborhoods and our families. I appreciated the points of view expressed in this book, and look forward to applying their approach to grace-filled political conversations in my own life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kennedy

    I THINK THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT WE NEED. I've been vaguely interested in politics without feeling like I could talk about it in most situations and without feeling like I could escape the bubble of people who agree with me. Sarah & Beth are leading a whole movement of people who aren't afraid to talk about the controversial topics and aren't sacrificing their relationships to do it. It's a joy to read and makes me feel hopeful that we can move past this stalemate of hyper-partisanship.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Heckenmueller

    I received an advanced reader copy of this book. I believe the books content and encouragement toward nuance in political conversations is important and necessary. They had good pointers along the way of how to practice what they are talking about and questions to get you thinking. I enjoyed the specific examples of how they approached political topics and what they learned throughout the process. The chapter on getting out of your echo chamber seemed especially helpful. I think many people will I received an advanced reader copy of this book. I believe the books content and encouragement toward nuance in political conversations is important and necessary. They had good pointers along the way of how to practice what they are talking about and questions to get you thinking. I enjoyed the specific examples of how they approached political topics and what they learned throughout the process. The chapter on getting out of your echo chamber seemed especially helpful. I think many people will find this book challenging and very helpful.  My disclaimers following the reasons I liked but didn't love this book: 1. I haven't listened to their podcast. 2. I've only recently been more interested in politics and have never found myself needing to identify with a political team. (The idea of taking off your team Jersey was discussed often in the book) 3. I found the stuff about God/faith surprising, but maybe I wouldn't have if I had listened to the podcast more regularly. 4. I live in grey, and not often black and white so the idea of nuance gaining momentum is exciting to me but not something new to me personally.  All that being said, I found the book often repetitive which made some of the chapters seem slow and hard to get through. Much of what was being shared seemed like common sense, but clearly isn't due to the divisiveness of our political climate, and for that I'm thankful that they are putting it out into the world. Many, if not all, of the questions to get you thinking at the end of the book had a biblical foundation and my relationship with the Bible is rocky right now so I had wished that the questions would reach a wider audience. The authors do note that their faith is important to them and they had struggled with whether or not to include it in the book and podcast which I appreciated them sharing. Overall, I still learned some from this book and am hopeful for the kind of positive change to political conversations and action it may spark.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kaytee Cobb

    This book has all the right stuff. Sarah and Beth already captured my attention with their fantastic podcast. I have learned so much through listening to these two brilliant and nuanced women chat twice a week. But this book? This book takes it to the next level. I got to pre-read it as an ARC, but true story: I went and ordered a paper copy as soon as i finished it, because I know I'll want one to re-read and mark up and highlight and answer questions in, especially over the coming year as the This book has all the right stuff. Sarah and Beth already captured my attention with their fantastic podcast. I have learned so much through listening to these two brilliant and nuanced women chat twice a week. But this book? This book takes it to the next level. I got to pre-read it as an ARC, but true story: I went and ordered a paper copy as soon as i finished it, because I know I'll want one to re-read and mark up and highlight and answer questions in, especially over the coming year as the primaries get started. Each chapter of this book takes us deep into examining ourselves, our motives, our stances, our prejudices. We get to dive deep into controversial topics, we get to see it play out in real life conversations shared with nuance and love. It's really, truly fabulous. I will certainly be buying this for friends and family in the coming year as well. ❤

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I'm so grateful for this book. Yes, it's a guide for how to have more productive political conversations, but it's more than that. It guides you through examining yourself and your motives. It challenges you to rethink assumptions, embrace curiosity, and "get comfortable with being uncomfortable." It's given me a new way to think about myself and others, and a new way to think about and approach politics and political engagement. I especially appreciate the way Sarah and Beth demonstrate the pri I'm so grateful for this book. Yes, it's a guide for how to have more productive political conversations, but it's more than that. It guides you through examining yourself and your motives. It challenges you to rethink assumptions, embrace curiosity, and "get comfortable with being uncomfortable." It's given me a new way to think about myself and others, and a new way to think about and approach politics and political engagement. I especially appreciate the way Sarah and Beth demonstrate the principles they outline through taking deep dives into social and political issues. They write with honesty, grace, and humor. I'm looking forward to rereading it and putting the principles into practice.

  11. 4 out of 5

    rsvreads

    As a progressive surrounded by conservative friends and coworkers I thought this book would have been perfect for me, but I didn’t learn anything I haven’t learned by just being a person in the south with different political opinions from the majority of the people next to me. I agree with the fundamental premise that we should treat others with dignity and learn to communicate about politics in a more empathetic way, but there was a veneer of white southern Christian privilege that sometimes fe As a progressive surrounded by conservative friends and coworkers I thought this book would have been perfect for me, but I didn’t learn anything I haven’t learned by just being a person in the south with different political opinions from the majority of the people next to me. I agree with the fundamental premise that we should treat others with dignity and learn to communicate about politics in a more empathetic way, but there was a veneer of white southern Christian privilege that sometimes felt out of touch. With that said, I’m sure there are people who will get a lot out of this book, but it didn’t live up to my expectations.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jill Kleis

    My first book of 2019 was a true revelation. Coming off a fraught midterm election season, and perhaps a holiday where you cringed at the thought of talking politics with your family, I’m here to tell you there is a better way. I genuinely think this is a must-read for everyone who has felt overwhelmed by how divided our country seems. It is a guide map for progress instead of gridlock. I was given an advanced copy, but you can get your copy on its release day, February 5 or preorder it now. And My first book of 2019 was a true revelation. Coming off a fraught midterm election season, and perhaps a holiday where you cringed at the thought of talking politics with your family, I’m here to tell you there is a better way. I genuinely think this is a must-read for everyone who has felt overwhelmed by how divided our country seems. It is a guide map for progress instead of gridlock. I was given an advanced copy, but you can get your copy on its release day, February 5 or preorder it now. And if you’re feeling generous, you could send a copy to your representatives, who could absolutely stand to hear the message that their constituents are tired of conflict and are ready for conciliation. #imlisteningbook Pantsuit Politics

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I look forward to the Pantsuit Politics podcast episodes each week, and I took my time working through Sarah and Beth’s book because I wanted to stop and think about each thing they had to say. I like how they guide and provide a chance for reflection without telling readers and listeners, “this is what you need to do.” I plan on coming back to this in the audio form, because I just love hearing Sarah and Beth talk about everything. Read this, then buy a copy for someone you know. Or give your r I look forward to the Pantsuit Politics podcast episodes each week, and I took my time working through Sarah and Beth’s book because I wanted to stop and think about each thing they had to say. I like how they guide and provide a chance for reflection without telling readers and listeners, “this is what you need to do.” I plan on coming back to this in the audio form, because I just love hearing Sarah and Beth talk about everything. Read this, then buy a copy for someone you know. Or give your rep a copy.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Scottsdale Public Library

    Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers, hosts of a popular podcast, discuss the importance of engaging in meaningful political discussions with those who don't agree with your political views. In an age when most of us shy away from political conversations, this book encourages the reader to engage with friends and family members on opposite sides of the aisle--and provides helpful techniques for doing so. This book is a great resource for anyone who wishes to have worthwhile dialog about politi Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers, hosts of a popular podcast, discuss the importance of engaging in meaningful political discussions with those who don't agree with your political views. In an age when most of us shy away from political conversations, this book encourages the reader to engage with friends and family members on opposite sides of the aisle--and provides helpful techniques for doing so. This book is a great resource for anyone who wishes to have worthwhile dialog about politics rather than remaining within their own echo chamber. – Stacie W.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa notes

    This is how books on politics should be written. Yes, talk about the issues. But also yes, talk about HOW to talk about the issues. With dignity. With openness. With suggestions on how to listen to the other side. If we could follow the advice given in this book about how to talk about politics, we would have much better conversations. And actions. And relationships. These are things that matter to all of us, regardless of which political jersey we wear. My thanks to the publisher for the review This is how books on politics should be written. Yes, talk about the issues. But also yes, talk about HOW to talk about the issues. With dignity. With openness. With suggestions on how to listen to the other side. If we could follow the advice given in this book about how to talk about politics, we would have much better conversations. And actions. And relationships. These are things that matter to all of us, regardless of which political jersey we wear. My thanks to the publisher for the review copy of this book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    In all fairness, I only read about half of this book. While I appreciated some of their comments, their foundation was far too weak and their insights far too common to justify continued reading. The authors cite their Christian faith as their inspiration, but offer nothing beyond out-of-context verses, culturally vogue words, and Kumbaya. Example: They briefly relate the parable of building on sand vs. building on rock (Matthew 7:24-27), but alter the meaning entirely. Rather than the rock bein In all fairness, I only read about half of this book. While I appreciated some of their comments, their foundation was far too weak and their insights far too common to justify continued reading. The authors cite their Christian faith as their inspiration, but offer nothing beyond out-of-context verses, culturally vogue words, and Kumbaya. Example: They briefly relate the parable of building on sand vs. building on rock (Matthew 7:24-27), but alter the meaning entirely. Rather than the rock being Christ and his words, as it literally says in the verse, the rock is interpreted as "your own values," whatever they may be. (Everyone's values are equally valid, BTW). Later on, they define "the grace of God" as God inviting us all to a big party known as life on Planet Earth. It was at that point that I closed the book and decided to use my time a bit more wisely. After writing this review, of course. Bottom line: A few good points, but overall mush. Not really worth your time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Janelle Oppenheimer

    I loved this book so much! What Beth and Sarah have to say is so important to the political climate today. The issues we are facing are not simple, black and white issues as some would prefer to believe. Learning how to value your own experience and perspective while being mindful that it is not the only valid one is a lost art that this book aims to help us regain.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Erika B.

    This was really good. I’m a huge fan of Beth and Sarah’s podcast, and I feel like their book really examined and built on what they do on the podcast. I liked to read this slowly, a chapter or two at a time, so that I could think about and absorb the ideas. All in all, a really helpful and encouraging book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin Goettsch

    Oh man I wanted to love this. The premise is so great. Their ideas for kind and curious dialogue are so great. But the whole premise of the book assumes that all sides are able and willing to adopt nuance (which I think we all desperately need) and there is VERY little here about how to deal with the obstinance that is completely pervasive. And so the book ended up feeling like I was being lectured on how to pacify people who truly think facts don’t matter. I just... don’t think that further nor Oh man I wanted to love this. The premise is so great. Their ideas for kind and curious dialogue are so great. But the whole premise of the book assumes that all sides are able and willing to adopt nuance (which I think we all desperately need) and there is VERY little here about how to deal with the obstinance that is completely pervasive. And so the book ended up feeling like I was being lectured on how to pacify people who truly think facts don’t matter. I just... don’t think that further normalizing that will help. So while these ladies seem lovely and their ideas (in theory!) are absolutely what our country needs, I just don’t find this very practical or helpful right now, it mostly just made me feel crabby. But I appreciate that they wrote it. I dream of the day when this can be our world again.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Stulce

    If ever there was a time we needed healing in political culture, across our communities and even within our families, that time is now. In I Think You’re Wrong, But I’m Listening, Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers present a prescription certain to build bridges across the political divide. Known to fans of their Pantsuit Politics podcast for their gift of seeing the gray in issues often presented in stark black and white, their voices challenge the reader from the page to forsake his or her If ever there was a time we needed healing in political culture, across our communities and even within our families, that time is now. In I Think You’re Wrong, But I’m Listening, Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers present a prescription certain to build bridges across the political divide. Known to fans of their Pantsuit Politics podcast for their gift of seeing the gray in issues often presented in stark black and white, their voices challenge the reader from the page to forsake his or her entrenched position and relinquish the team jersey he or she typically wears as armor into difficult discussions of all things political, equipping the reader with practical tools for having more nuanced conversations with those with whom they disagree. Holland and Stewart posit that common ground is there for the finding, even when it comes to the most controversial issues of the day. With wit and grace oozing from every page, I Think You’re Wrong, But I’m Listening is a must-read for legislators, voters and citizens of every stripe. I received this book from the publisher.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Taddey

    If this book doesn’t give you all sorts of hope for our future, maybe try reading it again. I adore Sarah and Beth and this book is groundbreaking in the way they talk politics. If we could get this into the hands of our nation’s political leaders, I really believe this could change the dynamics of our conversations. Beth & Sarah share their thoughts and viewpoints on a variety of issues in this book, but the best thing they do is give practical tips for us, as readers. Taking the questions If this book doesn’t give you all sorts of hope for our future, maybe try reading it again. I adore Sarah and Beth and this book is groundbreaking in the way they talk politics. If we could get this into the hands of our nation’s political leaders, I really believe this could change the dynamics of our conversations. Beth & Sarah share their thoughts and viewpoints on a variety of issues in this book, but the best thing they do is give practical tips for us, as readers. Taking the questions and action steps they provide for each chapter allows you to journey along side them in practicing grace and nuance. Highly recommend! *I was provided an advance copy of this book by the publisher, but all thoughts and opinions are 100% my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Calo-Oy

    “Talking politics is a gift to yourself and to the world. Ultimately, politics is really about people. People are never boring, and people belong together. We are meant to hash out how we want to live in community with one another. We’re meant to sort out our different beliefs about what government should and shouldn’t do, what laws and programs we do and don’t need, and how we should and shouldn’t spend taxpayer dollars.” That’s right from the introduction of this book, and I couldn’t agree mor “Talking politics is a gift to yourself and to the world. Ultimately, politics is really about people. People are never boring, and people belong together. We are meant to hash out how we want to live in community with one another. We’re meant to sort out our different beliefs about what government should and shouldn’t do, what laws and programs we do and don’t need, and how we should and shouldn’t spend taxpayer dollars.” That’s right from the introduction of this book, and I couldn’t agree more! I have loved politics for ages and ages and had some really fantastic conversations with people who I don’t agree with. We were able to hear what the other person had to say about why they believed what they believed and sometimes we could even change each other’s mind on a topic because it made so much sense when it was explained. Over the past several years, these kinds of conversations have been few and far between in my life because we are also so anxious to use our conversation speaking time to demand the other person hear our correct opinion and then we use our listening time to come up with the next few bullet points of why the other person is wrong. Pantsuit Politics is a podcast hosted by these two authors, who intentionally discuss hot topics and politics in an increasingly polarized world. What makes it different is they expect their listeners to be appreciative of nuance, they listen to each other and offer thoughtful responses, and focus on the fact you absolutely can discuss politics and government and come to an understanding with someone from a different party and you might even be able to learn something through it all. They wrote this book in two parts, the first talks about questions you need to ask yourself before you are ready to engage and the second has specific ideas for how to dialogue on contentious topics. It’s well-written, interesting, and a book I would recommend to anyone interested in engaging in their community better. There’s no push or pull to a specific political party or set of governing philosophies. It helps to create a willingness to check your thoughts and ideas and then intentionally understand the opposite view point without feeling like you need to attack or be defensive. I’m so glad I got an advance copy from the publisher!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Miller

    Every time I get frustrated with politics I always think a lot of problems could be solved if people stopped talking for a minute, listened to someone else, and thought before they responded. This book is a better, deeper guide to that discussion. And I love it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I’ve only read the introduction and the first chapter, but I am hooked. I’ve been one who has avoided political conversations my entire life. I don’t like the conflict especially in the last several years. I do now see validity in having these discussions with people who will talk, listen, and learn from each others instead of the yelling and name calling that comes on social media.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve Trono

    I was very intrigued by the title of this book and have encountered many moments, especially during the past few years, when tensions were high in political conversations I was a part of. Initially, I wasn't sure if it would be the right fit for me when it shared they it would be coming from their Christian perspective as I often struggle with books that tie religion and politics together. Fortunately, I didn't need to worry about that because this book had a great balance and I didn't find that I was very intrigued by the title of this book and have encountered many moments, especially during the past few years, when tensions were high in political conversations I was a part of. Initially, I wasn't sure if it would be the right fit for me when it shared they it would be coming from their Christian perspective as I often struggle with books that tie religion and politics together. Fortunately, I didn't need to worry about that because this book had a great balance and I didn't find that that the religious aspect took anything away from this well-balanced plot. I think You're Wrong (But I'm Listening) was an engaging and thought-provoking book filled with insight, suggestions and discussion topics. I appreciated the insights of Holland and Silvers and admired they were both passionate about their beliefs, even if they were different in many ways. I thought it was wonderful advice to first look inside yourself before reaching outwards. When we realize how our own lives and perspectives have helped form and shaped our own beliefs, it is easier to approach political conversations in a much different way. Many people's beliefs stem from experiences and situations they have been through in their own lives. When we can listen and emphasize, we are able to have less combative conversations. We can be respectful even if we disagree. Sometimes when we give the time and space to hear someone's perspective, it can help us see where they might be coming from. This was a powerful read for me and was a great introduction to having more productive and meaningful conversations in your daily life regarding critical issues. It also introduced me to Holland and Silver's Podcast series, Pantsuit Politics, which I have found to be highly educational and a great way to keep up on current politic issues. Thank you to NetGalley and Nelson books for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emma | everemmareads

    This little book took me a solid two weeks to read, mainly because it made me think and examine my interactions in regards to politics. . The truth is that I'm tired. I'm tired of the extremes found on both sides of the aisle. I'm tired of the villainizing of those with whom you don't agree. I'm tired of feeling like one of the few who tries to look at things from different angles. I'm tired of people not being able to see past a party label to really see who they are sending to represent them. I' This little book took me a solid two weeks to read, mainly because it made me think and examine my interactions in regards to politics. . The truth is that I'm tired. I'm tired of the extremes found on both sides of the aisle. I'm tired of the villainizing of those with whom you don't agree. I'm tired of feeling like one of the few who tries to look at things from different angles. I'm tired of people not being able to see past a party label to really see who they are sending to represent them. I'm tired of those elected officials acting like children fighting over toys. I'm exhausted and disillusioned. . This book gives me some hope. 𝗧𝗵𝗶𝘀 𝗶𝘀 𝗮 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝗜 𝘄𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗽𝗿𝗲𝘀𝘀 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗼 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗿𝘆𝗼𝗻𝗲'𝘀 𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗱𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗶𝗳 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝗱𝗼𝗻'𝘁 𝗿𝗲𝗮𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲𝗻 𝗜 𝘄𝗮𝗻𝘁 𝘆𝗼𝘂 𝘁𝗼 𝗮𝘁 𝗹𝗲𝗮𝘀𝘁 𝗹𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗻 𝘁𝗼 @pantsuitpolitics! . It's time we all start having constructive, caring conversations and this is a good start to understand how we can go about doing that. . If you're willing to have a real, grace-filled conversation where you too are open to examining your ideas, then I'm game. .

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Stevens

    This is a really practical guide to navigating our current state of politics among friends and family. Had it been available I few years ago I might have avoided a few mistakes in this realm! The authors and publisher are coming from a Christian perspective, but I would not allow that to put anyone off of reading this book. I do not share that faith, but found nothing in here that did not apply to me. The object of this book is to help us to have more useful attitudes within ourselves and then ap This is a really practical guide to navigating our current state of politics among friends and family. Had it been available I few years ago I might have avoided a few mistakes in this realm! The authors and publisher are coming from a Christian perspective, but I would not allow that to put anyone off of reading this book. I do not share that faith, but found nothing in here that did not apply to me. The object of this book is to help us to have more useful attitudes within ourselves and then approaches with others, so that we can grow in respect and understanding for those who may vote differently from us. That project knows no limitations of religion! Holland and Silvers advocate first doing business within our own hearts and minds, and then reaching out in conversation. They have structured their book accordingly, with sections entitled "Start With You" and "Turn Your Eyes Outward." I particularly learned from the chapter entitled "Find Your Why." Below the level of particular politicians and policies, deep where our values reside, all of us can (and should!) find much agreement. With big thanks to NetGalley and Nelson books for an advance copy of this really worthwhile title.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Holly Minion

    4.5 ⭐ I’ve listened to the Pantsuit Politics podcast since 2016 and have learned so much about foreign and domestic policy, how campaigns work, and how to be a better citizen. This book feels like a great extension of their podcast. Too often these days we cut people off—whether in words or just in our thoughts—with “I think you’re wrong.” Listening to and acknowledging another side is difficult and messy. My husband and I have been working on this over the past five years and it’s changed not o 4.5 ⭐️ I’ve listened to the Pantsuit Politics podcast since 2016 and have learned so much about foreign and domestic policy, how campaigns work, and how to be a better citizen. This book feels like a great extension of their podcast. Too often these days we cut people off—whether in words or just in our thoughts—with “I think you’re wrong.” Listening to and acknowledging another side is difficult and messy. My husband and I have been working on this over the past five years and it’s changed not only how we vote in some cases, but also how we view others. This book was a great encouragement to keep seeing our fellow citizens as people whom God loves and souls we are to love as well.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bridgit Morgan

    I recently discovered the podcast Pantsuit Politics, and I have been really enjoying listening to Sarah & Beth discuss recent news and interesting topics each week. This book offers a lot of great advice for speaking to those who might hold differing political views from you. Engaging in complex (and often difficult) political conversations with others is a terrifying prospect for most of us, but it's so incredibly important in today's current political environment. The religious-y side of t I recently discovered the podcast Pantsuit Politics, and I have been really enjoying listening to Sarah & Beth discuss recent news and interesting topics each week. This book offers a lot of great advice for speaking to those who might hold differing political views from you. Engaging in complex (and often difficult) political conversations with others is a terrifying prospect for most of us, but it's so incredibly important in today's current political environment. The religious-y side of this book really didn't do a lot for me, but it also didn't detract from the importance of the overall message. I highly recommend this one!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    I wish I could make everyone I know read this book. The authors believe that one reason why most people have a hard time engaging in civilized political discussions is because we've never been taught how to discuss hard issues with grace and respect--we've been taught to avoid them instead. The book is filled with practical and wise advice about how to have engaging, nuanced conversations. Their suggestions are not always easy, but they are necessary in this political climate. In addition to thi I wish I could make everyone I know read this book. The authors believe that one reason why most people have a hard time engaging in civilized political discussions is because we've never been taught how to discuss hard issues with grace and respect--we've been taught to avoid them instead. The book is filled with practical and wise advice about how to have engaging, nuanced conversations. Their suggestions are not always easy, but they are necessary in this political climate. In addition to this advice, I also learned a lot about some political issues that I didn't know before, such as a short history of welfare. However, I believe in order to really benefit from this book, you need to be willing to listen and learn from someone who may not believe the same thing that you do. That can be a difficult thing to do, and unfortunately I think a lot of people might be unwilling to do that. But my hope is that everyone who reads this book--myself included--will start looking for new ways to engage with and discuss politics while also treating our fellow human beings with kindness and respect. *I received an advance PDF copy from the publisher.*

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