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Mentors: How to Help and be Helped

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Could happiness lie in helping others and being open to accepting help yourself?Mentors – the follow up to Sunday Times number one bestseller, Recovery – describes the benefits of seeking and offering help.‘I have mentors in every area of my life, as a comic, a dad, a recovering drug addict, a spiritual being and as a man who believes that we, as individuals and the great Could happiness lie in helping others and being open to accepting help yourself?Mentors – the follow up to Sunday Times number one bestseller, Recovery – describes the benefits of seeking and offering help.‘I have mentors in every area of my life, as a comic, a dad, a recovering drug addict, a spiritual being and as a man who believes that we, as individuals and the great globe itself, are works in progress and that through a chain of mentorship we can improve individually and globally, together . . . One of the unexpected advantages my drug addiction granted is that the process of recovery that I practise includes a mentorship tradition. I will encourage you to find mentors of your own and explain how you may better use the ones you already have. Furthermore, I will tell you about my experiences mentoring others and how invaluable that has been on my ongoing journey to self-acceptance and how it has helped me to transform from a bewildered and volatile vagabond to a (mostly) present and (usually) focussed husband and father.’Mentors: How to Help and Be Helped describes the impact that a series of significant people have had on the author – from the wayward youths he tried to emulate growing up in Essex, through the first ex-junkie sage, to the people he turns to today to help him be a better father. It explores how we all – consciously and unconsciously – choose guides, mentors and heroes throughout our lives and examines the new perspectives they can bring.

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Could happiness lie in helping others and being open to accepting help yourself?Mentors – the follow up to Sunday Times number one bestseller, Recovery – describes the benefits of seeking and offering help.‘I have mentors in every area of my life, as a comic, a dad, a recovering drug addict, a spiritual being and as a man who believes that we, as individuals and the great Could happiness lie in helping others and being open to accepting help yourself?Mentors – the follow up to Sunday Times number one bestseller, Recovery – describes the benefits of seeking and offering help.‘I have mentors in every area of my life, as a comic, a dad, a recovering drug addict, a spiritual being and as a man who believes that we, as individuals and the great globe itself, are works in progress and that through a chain of mentorship we can improve individually and globally, together . . . One of the unexpected advantages my drug addiction granted is that the process of recovery that I practise includes a mentorship tradition. I will encourage you to find mentors of your own and explain how you may better use the ones you already have. Furthermore, I will tell you about my experiences mentoring others and how invaluable that has been on my ongoing journey to self-acceptance and how it has helped me to transform from a bewildered and volatile vagabond to a (mostly) present and (usually) focussed husband and father.’Mentors: How to Help and Be Helped describes the impact that a series of significant people have had on the author – from the wayward youths he tried to emulate growing up in Essex, through the first ex-junkie sage, to the people he turns to today to help him be a better father. It explores how we all – consciously and unconsciously – choose guides, mentors and heroes throughout our lives and examines the new perspectives they can bring.

30 review for Mentors: How to Help and be Helped

  1. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    A good book. Don't judge this book by its size, this book. This book contains some condensed in some cases summarised versions of his book Recovery, but it is not the same book. This is part Russell's thank you to people who have mentored him, and mainly the importance of mentoring and finding the correct mentor. He goes through the characteristics needed, as well as what he learned and then passed on to people he has mentored. Their is a great chapter on his experience of parenthood, as well as d A good book. Don't judge this book by its size, this book. This book contains some condensed in some cases summarised versions of his book Recovery, but it is not the same book. This is part Russell's thank you to people who have mentored him, and mainly the importance of mentoring and finding the correct mentor. He goes through the characteristics needed, as well as what he learned and then passed on to people he has mentored. Their is a great chapter on his experience of parenthood, as well as dealing with every parents worst nightmare. If you are looking for a quick easy read this is not the correct book. It is deep in some places, light hearted in others. Unlike in Revolution where Brand spoke of a revolution to come, but himself was not sure where he was not sure which side he would be classed on when it did come, he know exactly where he stands on the topic of mentoring. How important it is, what people should look for, and it works. He uses himself as an example to illustrate what mentoring has done for him and allowed him to do for others. Like a good teacher, a good mentor not only guides, but never stops learning from those he is helping.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kylie

    Look, lets get this out of the way first - Russell Brand is wordy. He strings out a sentence that could be condensed down into three words, but he does it in such a way that you know his brain has been slow cooking the thoughts for such a time that the meat of the sentence is falling off the bones and can only be held together with poetic expanse and entropic tangential lines of thought. Oh, it seems I am a bit wordy too. I really liked this one, I did not read Recovery, despite my addiction to Look, lets get this out of the way first - Russell Brand is wordy. He strings out a sentence that could be condensed down into three words, but he does it in such a way that you know his brain has been slow cooking the thoughts for such a time that the meat of the sentence is falling off the bones and can only be held together with poetic expanse and entropic tangential lines of thought. Oh, it seems I am a bit wordy too. I really liked this one, I did not read Recovery, despite my addiction to writing longer sentences than necessary and my obsession with needing to know everything, I didnt think it was applicable to me. I may have to go back and read it, because if asked, I would have thought Mentors didnt apply to me either, but I got a lot out of it. I read the book in the same month that I started listening to Under the Skin, and so there was a bit of crossover. But the relationships he mentions that were either mentor or mentee at various stages of his recovery or his life, were beautiful to experience. Whether spiritual, physical, psychological or just based in friendship, Brand explores the people that have inspired him to become the bearded bastion of philosophy that is today. I think fatherhood has had an enormous impact on Brand's view of the world, and it comes through in his recollections of past relationships and present experiences. The knowledge that the ultimate role of mentorship has been thrust upon him forever has given him insight into what it takes to allow yourself to be helped or guided by the wisdom of others, and what it means to pay that forward. This is a book for everyone, and serves as a reminder to stop and think about the people that have - deliberately or not - become mentors to you on your own journey. Russell Brand is becoming one of my favourite voices in this mixed self-help/philosophy/motivation genre.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Naaz

    I didn't read it, rather I listened to it - which is my preferred method when it comes to Russell Brand. He is wordy, which is to be expected. But he is also insightful, self-aware, endearingly flawed and full of fresh perspective. I enjoyed it and will probably give it another listen.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    Russell Brand has a way of writing things in a way that sounds like it is something you'd expect at a Poetry Slam. It is insightful and visual, poignant and eloquent, humorous and heartfelt. Not like Chewbacca in a taxi. You get the idea? However, most of this book is the journey through Russell's life and the key people who have and still do influence and help him on the path to being a better person. It's another book in my canon of 'success' stories and what it takes to be better at being huma Russell Brand has a way of writing things in a way that sounds like it is something you'd expect at a Poetry Slam. It is insightful and visual, poignant and eloquent, humorous and heartfelt. Not like Chewbacca in a taxi. You get the idea? However, most of this book is the journey through Russell's life and the key people who have and still do influence and help him on the path to being a better person. It's another book in my canon of 'success' stories and what it takes to be better at being human. Russell takes us through his addiction, his showbiz life, and parenthood, plus all the cracks and bridges in between. He explains how his mentors helped him, but also discusses the traits of mentors so you get an idea of how to be when your calling comes - even a friend might end up citing you as an inspiration (or mentor in some form) even after you support them during the briefest of periods. Russell ends the book with the 12-step process used in his recovery (which is also the basis for many structured programs of all types) and proposes this as a model for mentoring in general. Very useful. He also guides the reader to seek out mentors and help identify the qualities you expect from them and what they expect from you for it to work. Although short, this is a good introduction to the framework of mentoring and a lovely way to say thanks to all the people who have (and still do) positively impact his life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jazz Singh

    Here Russell Brand describes his journey through a selection of 8 mentors that he worked with for self recover, sanity and elevated happiness. He focuses on self-healing and mental stability through the acceptance and support of individual mentors. A very descriptive and detailed expression throughout the different stages of his early life to his current adult years. He focuses on the importance of heroes, role models and mentors to help guide you to a much more improved version of yourself and p Here Russell Brand describes his journey through a selection of 8 mentors that he worked with for self recover, sanity and elevated happiness. He focuses on self-healing and mental stability through the acceptance and support of individual mentors. A very descriptive and detailed expression throughout the different stages of his early life to his current adult years. He focuses on the importance of heroes, role models and mentors to help guide you to a much more improved version of yourself and progressing beyond your temporary limitations. A very well thought out projection of his mentors journey and how each one provided the accurate help, support and guidance needed in each of the stages of his self improvement mentors journey. Russell here has written, as he would speak to you or anyone, which makes the reading experience more enjoyable and real. He has his ways to script sentences and make perfect sense for the reader to relate to and understand. Overall a very well executed book that is thought provoking and challenges your perspective for the greater good.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Javad

    Really enjoyed Russell's new book. His honesty and wisdom make the book very pleasant to read. Really enjoyed it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Onceinabluemoon

    3.5 rounding up because I just like the guy! Since drug addiction he is constantly working on himself and very introspective, I admire that in him.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I came to this inspired by Russell Brand's recent podcasts, especially those with Gabor Maté and Fearne Cotton. I respect Russell's openness about his addictions, recovery path, and spiritual challenges. This book builds on that, illustrating how we do better at life if we go through it with others and allow ourselves to be guided by appropriate teachers (or mentors). Although the overall focus is Brand showing gratitude to the eight mentors featured, he also gives insight into his everyday stru I came to this inspired by Russell Brand's recent podcasts, especially those with Gabor Maté and Fearne Cotton. I respect Russell's openness about his addictions, recovery path, and spiritual challenges. This book builds on that, illustrating how we do better at life if we go through it with others and allow ourselves to be guided by appropriate teachers (or mentors). Although the overall focus is Brand showing gratitude to the eight mentors featured, he also gives insight into his everyday struggles and how he has learned from his past. Some of my favourite quotes from the book: On mentors: "I can only guess that they, like me, when invited to fill the role of guide, access an aspect of themselves not only unsullied by failure but elevated by it." On Pete, who would never, "yield to self-pity or rage" and had an, "incredible aptitude for positivity . . . I hold Pete in my mind as an antidote to self-pity. Perhaps if we spend time around positive people, being positive to one another, we can raise our common frequency as well as our individual well-being." "Radhanath Swami, like Amma, has entirely rejected the possibility that the material world can bring satisfaction. He prioritizes eternal principles such as compassion and integrity over temporary phenomena like prestige and haircuts. I need to study this as I still have a foot in each camp." "The word 'swami' means 'he who is with himself' . . . " "By being open to suggestion, by letting go of my will in favour of the will of others, I begin to change. . . . If you learn how to listen to your fear, how to recognize your uncertainty, you can then invite the superior consciousness of a mentor into your life." ". . . a mentor, well chosen, can guide you to the frontiers of your Self."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Siobhan Caulfield

    I love Russell Brand and his unique way of communicating his truths , very insightful, interesting and honest. Enjoyed very much

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark Farley

    As an additional adjacency to his brilliant self-help tome, Recovery, Russell introduces us to the many different characters in his life that has aided and abetted him (so to speak) throughout his spiritual improvement over the last decade or so. From sages to ex-addicts such as himself to business and medical professionals who guide and impart their wisdom, Mentors is full of great advice along with Brand's trademark wit. It's inspiring and thoughtful, tragic and sad in parts, but most of all, As an additional adjacency to his brilliant self-help tome, Recovery, Russell introduces us to the many different characters in his life that has aided and abetted him (so to speak) throughout his spiritual improvement over the last decade or so. From sages to ex-addicts such as himself to business and medical professionals who guide and impart their wisdom, Mentors is full of great advice along with Brand's trademark wit. It's inspiring and thoughtful, tragic and sad in parts, but most of all, clever and impactful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sam Williams

    As a disciple of Russell's "Trews" on YouTube and Under The Skin podcast, it's likely I'm being biased, but it seems every book Russell writes gets better and better; and this is no exception. Absolutely loved it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Imogen

    I loved Recovery by Russel Brand and what a brilliant book to follow it. It is very wordy and he rights exactly as if he is speaking directly to you which I liked. I think we tend to think of people having mentors for specific skills or moments in their life but this book shows that at any point we all need and can be mentors. I also particularly enjoyed his statement that mentors do not need to be perfect, that they can have just one quality that you are learning from them.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cath Lyders

    I sped through this. Funny and poignant. If you like Russell, the way he engages, and enjoy hearing his thoughts on the world and on himself, this is for you.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ting Tong

    Brand discusses the importance of mentors both in our lives and being one to others. He begins by suggesting that this book will suggest how to help and be help and understand the process of being a mentor and how to improve it. This is where my expectations laid a path to ruin. If you’ve ever listened to Russell Brand he often talks in a convoluted way which sounds fancy but contains very little substance. I doubt he does this intentionally but essentially he’s just a waffler. This book is esse Brand discusses the importance of mentors both in our lives and being one to others. He begins by suggesting that this book will suggest how to help and be help and understand the process of being a mentor and how to improve it. This is where my expectations laid a path to ruin. If you’ve ever listened to Russell Brand he often talks in a convoluted way which sounds fancy but contains very little substance. I doubt he does this intentionally but essentially he’s just a waffler. This book is essentially a self-indulgent tour through Brand’s life and the few minor experiences he’s had with his own mentors and being a mentor himself. I went back over the chapters and essentially each one contains about one sentence of use and thus the book’s wisdom could be condensed to a pamphlet. If Brand had advertised this book as a memoir I’d be more forgiving in this review; don’t claim to delve into mentorship if you just want to talk about yourself. The nuggets of wisdom he did posit are as follows: trust a mentor and be open minded to being vulnerable and talking about your feelings; they often have something you want and thus know more than you do. A mentor can be someone who fulfils a role for you such as a nurturing presence or someone who asks questions that allow you to self-sufficiently reveal your truth and whose comments give you insight that you wouldn’t come to on your own. We all need mentors in our life to override our own neuroses as they provide us with different views to help override our default programming, such as the possibility of asking someone ‘should I do this? What do you think I should do?’. We need mentors in our intimate relationships to understand what we feel our role is and what we need the role of our partner to be, and how to communicate this vulnerability in a positive way. Essentially mentors show us how to behave, guide us with their words and give freely what was given to them and thus so should you to those who seek your mentorship.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marcel Armstrong

    Russell Brand gifts us this book elucidating the many aspects of mentorship, from the perspective of the mentee to the mentor. He does so with the linguistic skill and eloquent brilliance of true genius. Russell's story not only encourages the reader/listener to discover the latent power and unique potential we all have within but also reminds us of the frailty and paradox of human nature. Whilst, on the one hand, we have these base needs of survival as individuals and as a species, on the other Russell Brand gifts us this book elucidating the many aspects of mentorship, from the perspective of the mentee to the mentor. He does so with the linguistic skill and eloquent brilliance of true genius. Russell's story not only encourages the reader/listener to discover the latent power and unique potential we all have within but also reminds us of the frailty and paradox of human nature. Whilst, on the one hand, we have these base needs of survival as individuals and as a species, on the other hand, there is longing for deeper spiritual needs of love, belonging and connection to one another and to the divine. Brand shares his experiences in rich candor and deep personal insight. Thanks for this book, Russell. You are indeed a gifted mentor and inspiration.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Atif Rahman

    The crux is in the appendix, the rest is his way to show gratitude to his mentors. Great part about his writing is there are no hodgy podgy secret recipes to mentor or be a good mentee. Just good plain advice. Three stars because I didnt take out anything novel from it, was hoping some depth from Russel Brand.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Malin Gisela

    My only complaint really was that it felt short (I read it in one sitting). I wish he would have continued on to cover more examples of people he's mentored himself. This book did make me think about the people I'm learning from on pretty much a daily basis, and made me appreciate everything they do for me and how they've helped me grow.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

    A very interesting and genuine sounding book but I use genuine with caution now that Brand is moving his podcast to a subscription site and no longer using free options. Sort of takes the shine off what he's got here, which is a great book able to help many people.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Luis Alejos

    Sublime

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Surprised by the reviews calling Russell wordy in this book. I found the language efficient and beautifully written. Interesting content.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Hannay

    Mentors Amazing, eloquent and inspiring! Would recommend for anyone, as anyone and everyone has the need for mentors as we all have the need to grow!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bianca

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liam Clarke

  26. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Emmerson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Kenny

  28. 5 out of 5

    James Markey

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hazel Veronica

  30. 5 out of 5

    Emma

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