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Silent Souls Weeping: Depression—Sharing Stories, Finding Hope

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In a culture that strives for happiness and perfection, depression and mental illness are often surrounded by stigma, misunderstanding, and endless questions. In Silent Souls Weeping, bestselling author and nationally-recognized journalist Jane Clayson Johnson hopes to change the LDS dialogue and cultural stigmas surrounding mental illness. She vulnerably shares her own ex In a culture that strives for happiness and perfection, depression and mental illness are often surrounded by stigma, misunderstanding, and endless questions. In Silent Souls Weeping, bestselling author and nationally-recognized journalist Jane Clayson Johnson hopes to change the LDS dialogue and cultural stigmas surrounding mental illness. She vulnerably shares her own experience with depression along with the experiences of many other Latter-day Saints, offering support to those suffering and understanding to those loving someone with depression.

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In a culture that strives for happiness and perfection, depression and mental illness are often surrounded by stigma, misunderstanding, and endless questions. In Silent Souls Weeping, bestselling author and nationally-recognized journalist Jane Clayson Johnson hopes to change the LDS dialogue and cultural stigmas surrounding mental illness. She vulnerably shares her own ex In a culture that strives for happiness and perfection, depression and mental illness are often surrounded by stigma, misunderstanding, and endless questions. In Silent Souls Weeping, bestselling author and nationally-recognized journalist Jane Clayson Johnson hopes to change the LDS dialogue and cultural stigmas surrounding mental illness. She vulnerably shares her own experience with depression along with the experiences of many other Latter-day Saints, offering support to those suffering and understanding to those loving someone with depression.

30 review for Silent Souls Weeping: Depression—Sharing Stories, Finding Hope

  1. 4 out of 5

    Janna

    There is much to celebrate with the publication of this book: it's a conversation starter for the important discussions members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints need to have regarding depression; it calls out the toxic perfectionism in our culture as a force that complicates symptoms of depression; it addresses depression in missionaries and youth; it looks at suicide as an epidemic in society; and so much more. I love that topics are explored through the stories and experiences There is much to celebrate with the publication of this book: it's a conversation starter for the important discussions members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints need to have regarding depression; it calls out the toxic perfectionism in our culture as a force that complicates symptoms of depression; it addresses depression in missionaries and youth; it looks at suicide as an epidemic in society; and so much more. I love that topics are explored through the stories and experiences of the people the author interviewed for the book. It really helps combat the feeling of isolation depression engenders. And it also adds a good deal of straight-talk to the book—the details feel as dark and raw as depression does. A particularly helpful chapter discusses the spiritual implications of depression and the feeling of sheer abandonment from God that so often settles in with the disease. The author doesn't, of course, offer a cure for depression. This is not a self-help book. It is a book about the people who deal with depression and the hope and despair they feel in their journeys. I highly recommend it to those who have depression and for the parents, children, siblings, leaders, and others who love them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Bartholomew

    I absolutely loved this book! I, myself, have struggled with depression and found so much hope and validation in this book. Jane is incredibly vulnerable as she shares her own personal battle with depression. She also does a wonderful job sharing other individual's stories of their struggle. She does a great job of sharing the realities of what people go through while suffering from depression, as well as offering nuggets of wisdom and hope. Even if you don't struggle with depression, chances ar I absolutely loved this book! I, myself, have struggled with depression and found so much hope and validation in this book. Jane is incredibly vulnerable as she shares her own personal battle with depression. She also does a wonderful job sharing other individual's stories of their struggle. She does a great job of sharing the realities of what people go through while suffering from depression, as well as offering nuggets of wisdom and hope. Even if you don't struggle with depression, chances are you know someone who does. It would be a great resource to help you understand what your loved one is going through, and how you might help. I highly recommend this book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amy Harding

    With an expert journalistic background, personal experience with depression, and a gift for connecting with the inner most parts of the human soul, Jane Clayson Johnson has captivated the core experience and intensity of emotions of suffering from mental illness in a whole and comprehensive way, specifically addressing the experience of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. As an over-all, but raw and close-up look at mental health struggles, every reader has the opportunit With an expert journalistic background, personal experience with depression, and a gift for connecting with the inner most parts of the human soul, Jane Clayson Johnson has captivated the core experience and intensity of emotions of suffering from mental illness in a whole and comprehensive way, specifically addressing the experience of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. As an over-all, but raw and close-up look at mental health struggles, every reader has the opportunity to understand mental illness, in all it's forms and severity, through personal accounts, yet within the context of gospel truths; to hear the the personal experiences of those who have suffered and those who love those who suffer; to understand the hope that is available from those (including a prophet, mission president, and missionaries) that have been able to endure, serve, and accomplish amazing things in their lives amidst the struggle with mental illness. Jane explores both the physiological and spiritual effects of mental illness, how loved ones can support those suffering from mental illness, as well as how we, as a culture, can better understand and support those that are struggling. I consider this a absolute must-read for everyone who wants to understand the modern epidemic of mental illness in an intimate way for the benefit of their loved ones, their children, their spouses, and themselves.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Wonderful book about depression and the stigma that surrounds it. It shares moving stories from both caretakers and those suffering with it and highlights depression in different groups (ie youth, postpartum, missionaries, etc). Conversation about this illness needs to happen more and I feel this book is a step in that direction. A helpful book whether a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints or not.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deyanne

    Stories are powerful and definitely an honest, open and vulnerable approach to depression is needed. I was hoping for more than story and the importance of sharing feelings.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I applaud those who overcame the stigma surrounding mental illness to share their deeply personal stories. This book is real, raw, and needed. The chances are good that you know or love someone who is a “silent soul weeping,” secretly battling depression or other mental illness.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Susanhayeshotmail.com

    Excellent. Not a self help book but if you or someone you love has ever struggled with depression or mental illness you will find validation, empathy, and hope in these pages. The author does not flinch when addressing any aspect of depression, including the terrible, rapidly rising rates of suicide. Silent Souls Weeping is directed at members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and deals with some things specific to LDS culture, such as depression among missionaries, but I would Excellent. Not a self help book but if you or someone you love has ever struggled with depression or mental illness you will find validation, empathy, and hope in these pages. The author does not flinch when addressing any aspect of depression, including the terrible, rapidly rising rates of suicide. Silent Souls Weeping is directed at members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and deals with some things specific to LDS culture, such as depression among missionaries, but I would consider most of the content universal. Written with compassion and understanding based on her own personal descent into depression Jane Clayson Johnson has written a timely and much needed work. One of my favorite things was the observation in one of her interviews that when one is diagnosed with cancer people organize and find ways to help and support. Which is as it should be. When one is diagnosed with depression or mental illness it's .... chirping crickets. Granted, it sometimes can be hard to know how to help and support someone struggling with mental illness but we need to do better. Depression can be every bit as debilitating as chemo and radiation therapy. I had an older friend years ago who had what we would now call postpartum depression. She knew there was something wrong, something that far exceeded "the baby blues" of a sleep deprived new mother but she didn't know how to explain what was happening, how desperate she was becoming, and she didn't want anyone to think she was crazy even though she was certain she was standing on the edge of of an abyss clearly labeled crazy. She told me if days when people would come to the door and she would run to her room, put on her robe, wrap a towel around her head as if that would explain why she wasn't dressed at 3 in the afternoon and her house was a mess. Even as she made jokes about the baby keeping her perpetually exhausted to the point she didn't know what time of day it was she silently wondered what it would take for someone to see there was something wrong. Somehow she powered through on her own. The "blues" as she called it lifted, equilibrium was restored, she bonded with her baby, she started showering and washing her hair for real. How grateful I am that we are moving away from the stigmas of mental illness. We have some miles yet to travel but as we know better we can do better and I think Silent Souls Weeping can play a role. I would take away half a star because there is not much dealing with the connection between chronic pain or illness and depression. They are often so entangled. Pain, lack of sleep, the financial burden such illnesses represent, the limits such diseases can put on one's ability to work, play, and even socialize, when added to the knowledge and understanding that "chronic" means that there may be treatment but there is no cure, can be devastating. Yes, we've all read or watched the stories of people rising above their diagnosis and refusing to be limited by their disease, they are inspiring but I think there are far more people quietly and valiantly just struggling to keep themselves together while fighting cyclical bouts of depression. And they need our help. When we know better we must do better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Summer Owens

    One of the many people Jane interviewed while writing this book was my husband. While he doesn't deal with mental illness first hand he's learned a lot about supporting a spouse through it. It has not been easy but we have both learned and grown together through this struggle. Please take the time to read this book. It offers hope to anyone struggling with mental anguish. It offers empathy to those looking on, wondering how to help. It is full of wisdom, beauty, and compassion.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Val

    When I hear people say "everyone should read this book" or "this book is a life-changer," I sometimes roll my eyes at what I am sure is exaggeration to increase book sales. It is with no exaggeration or book sales motive that I recommend THIS book unreservedly as a book everyone should read, and if everyone did, it would be a life-changer for the good for everyone. I would give it 6 stars if I could. I started reading this book the day after the funeral for my friend and long-time colleague who t When I hear people say "everyone should read this book" or "this book is a life-changer," I sometimes roll my eyes at what I am sure is exaggeration to increase book sales. It is with no exaggeration or book sales motive that I recommend THIS book unreservedly as a book everyone should read, and if everyone did, it would be a life-changer for the good for everyone. I would give it 6 stars if I could. I started reading this book the day after the funeral for my friend and long-time colleague who took his own life at age 53 after enduring the pains and unrelenting suffering of severe manic depression since his early youth. He was not my first friend to take his own life. One of my good friends since childhood took his own life 3 years ago, also as a result of severe depression. Both of these friends were members of my faith, and their suicides caused me to do a lot of searching, pondering, and praying about how we talk about depression and mental health in our faith, or more precisely, how we typically avoid talking about it openly and honestly as we should and NEED to do. This book is such a welcome addition to the slowly opening dialogue within the church about all forms of mental illness, but particularly depression, and not the temporary types but the long-term/permanent types that cannot be overcome with time, more prayer, more scripture study, or "pulling yourself up by your bootstraps." Although the author and the people she interviewed about mental illness and depression are members of one faith, most of the stories these depression sufferers and their families share with the author will resonate with people of most faiths or none. Yes, there are some chapters in the book that discuss (brilliantly) some aspects of depression that would be unique to members of one faith because of certain practices and expectations of that faith, but a reader of another faith could skip those chapters and still find the vast majority of this book exceptionally useful, touching, and honest in its efforts to help people with depression and those who are living with them and loving them through their darkest feelings. There is practical advice in this book for spouses, children, teens, church leaders, and friends who want to be helpful and minister to a family affected by mental health challenges but aren't sure what to do or what not to do. This is one reason I think everyone should read this book. Depression is the most widespread mental illness and the most likely to be encountered as you try to befriend and serve others. Recognizing signs, being aware and educated that severe long-term depression is an illness and not a choice or a consequence of choices, and what families go through when facing this illness can make ALL of us better prepared to serve each other in meaningful ways. The author talks openly and bluntly about aspects of our faith that can impact the mental health of its members. There is a portion on returned missionaries, especially those who return early for various reasons, and the feelings they experience that can be very detrimental to mental health. There are portions on things church leaders do or say that can help or hurt those who are enduring depression and other diagnosed mental illnesses. There are portions about ministering (aka visiting teach and home teaching) to individuals and families with mental illness challenges. There is a valuable portion on young mothers and the overwhelming feelings of guilt they can feel when their clinical depression keeps them from accomplishing everything every day that motherhood seems to require. SO much practical advice from real people sharing real experiences with the author, who they trust and know empathizes because of her own experience with clinical depression, which she shares in detail in this book. She helps readers differentiate between temporary "normal" bouts of depression such as post-partum or event-produced, and lasting long-term dangerous depression that indicates a mental illness that cannot be corrected to overcome without medical help. I really enjoyed the part where she describes interviewing her husband to get his perspective on when he first realized she had a serious illness and needed medical help. That discussion was so forthright and could be a model for how people need to talk about these issues with spouses and other family members. The chapter I wish everyone would read is the one on "perfection" and how our daily striving for it can play a significant role in our mental health if we do not have the right perspective of what "perfection" means or how soon we will be expected to achieve it (eternity is a LONG time, thankfully). The feelings of guilt and unhappiness at our imperfections can compound existing mental illness to drive one even deeper into despair. A lot of what the author discusses with her interviewees in this chapter explores similar themes that Elder Holland spoke about in his masterful discourse "Broken Vessels," but in much greater specificity and detail that will resonate with every church member, and likely with members of all faiths committed to constant daily striving to be more Christ-like or simply to be better examples of their faith, whatever it might be. The author interviewed more than 100 people and their stories are powerful, heartbreaking, courageous, and sometimes tragic. Yet that is what makes this book so important and effective. The greater tragedy would be if families experienced these heartbreaks and none of us learned from them so we can help someone else who may be on the same path. My review of this book could never give justice to how much I learned from it and how powerful it was to me at the time I read it. Everyone who reads this book will recognize in the stories shared someone they know right now who is suffering real depression. This book will be worth more than 5 stars to anyone who reads it, and could improve quality of life in families, or even save lives as readers become educated in depression as a real illness. The book is beautifully written. I highly recommend the audiobook, since the author is an award-winning journalist and a brilliant public speaker who personalized the issue of depression by giving voice to her own experiences and those of her interviewees.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I came across this book just when I needed it. It's been a rough while for me. I just can't seem to shake the depression this time around. I loved her insight and honesty. There is a huge stigma with mental illness especially in my church. "All you have to do is; read your scriptures more, pray more, have more faith. Dust yourself off, pull yourself up by the bootstraps. And serve, serve, serve." Nope. Doesn't always work that way. I want to run from church screaming every time I hear that. I've I came across this book just when I needed it. It's been a rough while for me. I just can't seem to shake the depression this time around. I loved her insight and honesty. There is a huge stigma with mental illness especially in my church. "All you have to do is; read your scriptures more, pray more, have more faith. Dust yourself off, pull yourself up by the bootstraps. And serve, serve, serve." Nope. Doesn't always work that way. I want to run from church screaming every time I hear that. I've been doing all that plus medicated for a year and seeing a doctor weekly for the past six months. Mental illness sucks! This book is great for those struggling or those with family members who struggle. It's very helpful to know you're not alone and a lot of people are going through the same thing you are. *It's geared towards a Christian audience*

  11. 5 out of 5

    Becky Nelson

    I learned a lot for hearing other's depression stories but at the same time it made me depressed so I couldn't decide how many stars to give this book. I did like the suggestions on how to reach out to those with mental illness.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lindquistheather

    I think this should be mandatory reading for the LDS community whether you struggle with depression yourself or you have a loved one who does. This was very helpful for me and my husband to read together.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Dickson

    This book needs to be read by anyone who knows people. It can help all gain insight into how we can have empathy and understanding for those who suffer from the affects of all kinds of mental illness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ramona McConkie

    These are important stories that need to be told. I'm just not in love with the journalist format for this subject. It feels a little cavalier, even though Jane does a great job with this skill of hers. I really respect her. She is doing something very difficult, vulnerable, and authentic. And more discourse about this subject is so, so needed in the church. I'm grateful she wrote this.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christina Hogewoning

    I am not a reader, and when I do actually read a book, I rarely get to the end. But I read this book in less than 5 days. I think this was especially powerful to me for a number of reasons. One being that Jane isn't a doctor or mental health specialist. Instead, she has dealt with depression, and I was able to relate to that. There is something about hearing personal stories from those who have struggled firsthand that makes what they have to say so much more meaningful. Two was simply the timing. I am not a reader, and when I do actually read a book, I rarely get to the end. But I read this book in less than 5 days. I think this was especially powerful to me for a number of reasons. One being that Jane isn't a doctor or mental health specialist. Instead, she has dealt with depression, and I was able to relate to that. There is something about hearing personal stories from those who have struggled firsthand that makes what they have to say so much more meaningful. Two was simply the timing. I've been struggling with depression for 15 years and counting. Recently I've been struggling with intense suicidal thoughts to the point that I had made a plan and set a date, both of which I had never previously done though I've had suicidal thoughts on and off for almost as long as I've dealt with depression. So to read this book while being in such a dark place was powerful. Three was simply Jane's goal to help start a conversation that is much needed right now. I have this burning desire to try to help others understand depression and suicidal ideation. And reading her book lit a fire within me. Knowing that I'm not alone in my want to spread awareness and end stigma made me realize how important this is... sharing experiences of mental illness, helping people understand, changing how people view those with mental illness, and being a voice for so many who can't share their personal stories for whatever reason. We have to do this. We have to start a conversation and rewrite the dialogue associated with mental illness. Four was the strength that comes from remembering you're not alone. Not only did Jane share her own story of dealing with depression, but she shared countless others. When you have depression, you feel completely and utterly alone. The reminder that others are going through similar things that you face is helpful. Five was the different perspectives on depression. From kids and teenagers to new mothers to return missionaries to those who are older. No category of people is exempt from this painful illness. Again, there is great strength that comes from realizing you are not alone. I could probably go on and on. My point is everyone needs to read this. Because it opens your mind whether you don't know anything about depression or you've suffered with it for 50 years. Everyone can take away something from this incredibly inspiring book. Please read it and share it! And let's keep opening the conversation on mental illness wider and wider!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cherise

    “It’s a lie the adversary loves and certainly hopes we will buy into: that each of us must suffer in solitude. The authentic connection you make when you share your story, and feel it resonate with another’s, shatters this lie, bringing hope, comfort, and confirmation that your suffering is real and you are not alone.” “By seeing how many kinds of resilience and strength and imagination are to be found, one can appreciate not only the horror of depression but also the complexity of human vitality “It’s a lie the adversary loves and certainly hopes we will buy into: that each of us must suffer in solitude. The authentic connection you make when you share your story, and feel it resonate with another’s, shatters this lie, bringing hope, comfort, and confirmation that your suffering is real and you are not alone.” “By seeing how many kinds of resilience and strength and imagination are to be found, one can appreciate not only the horror of depression but also the complexity of human vitality. . . . All of us have stories, and the true survivors have compelling stories.” I believe that healing for those who suffer from depression begins when we listen to these stories, when we encourage those who tell them to speak out about their pain and share their vulnerability. It comes, too, when we are willing to be vulnerable along with them, to sit with them in their pain and, hopefully, draw them out of isolation. Each person I interviewed, and nearly every book and article I picked up on the topic, agreed that “depression will only intensify in the private cocoon we spin at our lowest.” As someone who suffers from anxiety and depression this book was comforting - and helped dispel the misunderstandings that surround mental disease.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tonya

    We all have experience with depression, whether our own or those we love. This book is good for either. It is especially relevant and helpful for depression within the LDS culture. I liked how the chapters were organized and I was going to list the ones I particularly liked, but really they were all good. I love this author and would love to meet her or hear her speak someday.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Lesueur

    4.5 stars. This book was amazing. I love the way Jane confronts the negative stigma that is associated with depression in the LDS culture specifically. It is an ideal read for members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints who may know somebody who battles with mental illness.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lori S.

    Valuable information on depression for those who battle depression and those who work to understand, love, and care for them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Giving this 4 stars because although it is not the easiest book to read, it is a necessary one.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Interesting insights.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julianne

    Yep. Everyone would do well to read this excellent book! Well done Jane!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Delise

    Wish everyone I know would read this book. Compassionately and knowledgeably written. Difficult reading at times but so necessary to get a glimpse into life for so many. May we continue sharing, connecting and loving.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Very well done book! A great help for those who help people with depression

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kendall

    As someone who struggles with depression, I want my parents, my friends, my ward members, my bishop and anyone else I interact with in a church setting to read this book. It gives a beautiful window into what it feels like to live with depression. I had to read the first few chapters one at a time because it made me so emotional that someone had managed to capture that feeling I have never been able to describe precisely. Johnson carefully crafts the narrative around the experiences of hundreds As someone who struggles with depression, I want my parents, my friends, my ward members, my bishop and anyone else I interact with in a church setting to read this book. It gives a beautiful window into what it feels like to live with depression. I had to read the first few chapters one at a time because it made me so emotional that someone had managed to capture that feeling I have never been able to describe precisely. Johnson carefully crafts the narrative around the experiences of hundreds of people with depression that she interviewed (she says in the acknowledgements that she had at least a thousand pages of transcripts from those interviews). This is a guide book for the loved ones of those suffering under depressions weight. Johnson shares insights into how there can be caring and compassion when someone you love is struggling with something that is so hard to understand.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    A must read for everyone. Depression effects us all, directly or indirectly. This takes the stigma out of mental illnesses and gives positive options for healing. There is a light at the end of the tunnel.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tristen Smith

    This book has given me the courage to do things and open up in ways concerning my depression and anxiety disorder like never before. I want to help in the battle to do away with the stigma of mental illness, and this book has helped me to see that I can make a difference, while being patient with myself and accepting, after decades, that this is a disease, and I may have it the rest of my life. If that’s the case, then so be it. This book clearly illustrates I’m not alone, and neither are you. T This book has given me the courage to do things and open up in ways concerning my depression and anxiety disorder like never before. I want to help in the battle to do away with the stigma of mental illness, and this book has helped me to see that I can make a difference, while being patient with myself and accepting, after decades, that this is a disease, and I may have it the rest of my life. If that’s the case, then so be it. This book clearly illustrates I’m not alone, and neither are you. Thank you for writing this book!

  28. 4 out of 5

    belle liang

    With the narrative momentum of an award-winning investigative journalist, and the sensitivity of a fellow sojourner, Jane Clayson Johnson has expertly and lovingly drawn out the stories of those who have suffered silently with depression. She serves as trusted confidante, therapist, and spiritual guide, lifting the veil of stigma to create new community and provide a life line for those who feel alone or hopeless. It is her personal vulnerability, the lack of sugar-coating, her willingness to pl With the narrative momentum of an award-winning investigative journalist, and the sensitivity of a fellow sojourner, Jane Clayson Johnson has expertly and lovingly drawn out the stories of those who have suffered silently with depression. She serves as trusted confidante, therapist, and spiritual guide, lifting the veil of stigma to create new community and provide a life line for those who feel alone or hopeless. It is her personal vulnerability, the lack of sugar-coating, her willingness to place her own secret life in the limelight that strike me the most. During a time in history where people find no comfort in hollow platitudes, yet are more desperate for hope than ever, this book provides such intelligent and firsthand insight into how to join with God in the midst of personal suffering. L.B. Cowman described life as a steep and murky climb—we can’t see even steps in front of us and so we get afraid. We need the encouragement and wisdom of a fellow climber ahead of us who calls back to say “I’m here…this is what the path looks like up above you, here’s how I navigated when I was where you are…” This courageous and profound act of generosity reveals many beautiful things about the author herself—her deep soul and her belief in the power and sacred obligation of speaking one’s faith and telling one’s stories.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deb Lamb

    This book was so therapeutic for me. I have suffered with clinical depression off and on for 30 years. For most of those years I could not understand what was happening to me and I felt so isolated and alone because no one talked about it. It was especially difficult not being able to feel the spirit and to not feel love for those closest to me. Reading the stories of others who have shared their experiences was validating, gave me understanding, and let me know that I'm not alone nor did I make This book was so therapeutic for me. I have suffered with clinical depression off and on for 30 years. For most of those years I could not understand what was happening to me and I felt so isolated and alone because no one talked about it. It was especially difficult not being able to feel the spirit and to not feel love for those closest to me. Reading the stories of others who have shared their experiences was validating, gave me understanding, and let me know that I'm not alone nor did I make it up. It's interesting how sharing can be so healing and can give us strength. I wish everyone would read this book and have a conversation about it. It's time.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julia Southwick

    This book should’ve been written ages ago! It was powerful and bore impactful testimony to the importance of “mourning with those that mourn and comforting those who stand in need of comfort.” I am profoundly grateful to be blessed with friends and loved ones who have practically carried me through several major times of struggle, but I know that there are still so many people who don’t truly grasp depression and other mental illnesses or know how to help those who suffer. If everyone in the chu This book should’ve been written ages ago! It was powerful and bore impactful testimony to the importance of “mourning with those that mourn and comforting those who stand in need of comfort.” I am profoundly grateful to be blessed with friends and loved ones who have practically carried me through several major times of struggle, but I know that there are still so many people who don’t truly grasp depression and other mental illnesses or know how to help those who suffer. If everyone in the church read this book and took it to heart, I think it would really transform the way we love and serve one another. Beautiful.

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